What screams i'm 22

Defiant phase: ten strategies for parents

8. Follow the rules

Drawers are a magical attraction for young children. It's just stupid when, of all things, the most exciting is taboo. No later than the third no, there is a screaming alarm.

This is what Andreas Engel says: Children need boundaries, they give them stability. Basically, every time they test whether what was true yesterday still counts today. The rules should be straightforward and adapt to the age and abilities of the child.

That could help: Show your child what's in the drawer and explain that this is the mommy-daddy drawer. It remains taboo. If the child is crying, comfort him, distract him. As a parent, be clear about your position.

9. React with humor

In the evenings, scenes take place in many bathrooms that would be ready for a movie. The child is supposed to brush their teeth, but they refuse with their hands and feet against the toothbrush in their mouth.

This is what Andreas Engel says: Brushing your teeth is a rule that parents don't want to deviate from. But you are also exhausted from the day. Such a stressful situation then quickly boils up and escalates.

That could help: Surprise someone with something fun. Give the toothbrush a voice, make it dance. Humor often helps the child to give in and do something that they really didn't want to.

10. Please comfort

Your child desperately wants a toy that is mercilessly overpriced. You don't buy it. Your child is crying terribly.

This is what Andreas Engel says: Children lack the vision to judge whether the toy is good, bad or too expensive. Saying goodbye to the desire to have it feels like a grave loss to them.

That could help: Show understanding. Say, "I can understand you well. You are infinitely sad." Remain understanding even if your child mourns the toy for days.