What is Singapore's attitude towards the Malaysian Chinese

Culture-oriented analysis of external context factors of the western banks in Singapore, Malaysia and Vietnam

Intercultural Management of Western Banks in Southeast Asia pp 82-224 | Cite as

Part of the Schriften zum Europäische Management book series (SEM)

Summary

The subject of this third chapter is the analysis of the external context factors for internationally active banks in the Southeast Asian countries Singapore, Malaysia and Vietnam, which are intended to clarify the framework for an intercultural management approach. The contents of the following chapters can be demonstrated from this task.

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literature

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  82. However, through a government program in the 1970s, cultural and Confucian values ​​were specifically propagated in society as "main national values". See Lawson, S .: Culture of Politics [1998], pp. 242-243. The spread of the values, however, relates more to academic circles. Cf. Clammer, J.R .: Chinese Beliefs [1993], p. 214. This policy was supplemented by an additional promotion of the Chinese language (Mandarin dialect) as the language of culture in society at the end of the 1970s. As a "language of economics" (technology, science, economy), however, English was promoted from 1980 in order to promote the development opportunities of the students and thus ultimately the economy of Singapore. See Clammer, J.R .: Singapore: Ideology, Culture, Society [1985], pp. 100-101. This Mandarin dialect, although it was only spoken by about 1% of the ethnic Chinese population, was considered "adequate" for strengthening Chinese values ​​in society. See Lawson, S .: Culture of Politics [1998], pp. 242-243.Google Scholar
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  88. Woodside, A .: Struggle [1997], p. 65. Articles appear regularly in the Vietnamese daily press in which the Viet Kieus are presented with the simplified possibilities of returning and investing. See for example: Make country prosperous [2000]; o.V .: Buv houses at home [2000]. Google Scholar
  89. See Hainsworth, G.B .: Human Resource Development in Vietnam [1993], pp. 161-162. For the period from 1975 to 1990, it is estimated that around 800,000 ethnic Chinese left Vietnam via the Chinese border or as "boat people". See Tran, K .: Ethnic Chinese in Vietnam [1997], pp. 282–284, 292. Google Scholar
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  91. See Murray, G .: New Market [1997], pp. 65-66. Studies have shown that 55% of the 80,000 ethnic Chinese households in Ho Chi Minh City have relatives in more than 20 other countries. It is hoped that this will attract foreign capital to Vietnam, which should have a "leverage effect" on the economy. See Woodside, A .: Struggle [1997], p. 65. Google Scholar
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  94. See Weggel, O .: Culture and Value Concepts [1991], p. 45. See critically Mackie, J .: Southeast Asian Chinese [1998], pp. 134–135. Here the view is taken that in fact even the application of terms like, Confucian 'and, neo-Confucian' to the culture or values ​​of the Southeast Asian Chinese is so questionnable that the terms are best avoided entirely. "Mackie, J. : Southeast Asian Chinese [1998], p. 134. Google Scholar
  95. See Lawson, S .: Culture of Politics [1998], pp. 242-243. On the one hand, this results from the fact that in China these values ​​were lived by the higher, educated classes of the population, as this made a clear hierarchical structure and authoritarian leadership possible. The ethnic Chinese in Singapore and Malaysia come mainly from the former lower classes in southern China, so that the assimilation of these values ​​was not so widespread.Google Scholar
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  98. See Howell, J.D .: Religion [1998], pp. 116-117. Kong Fuzi ('Master Kong' or known as Confucius by Western cultures) lived from 551–479 BC and taught a system of social relationships that functions on the basis of harmony through respect for hierarchy in the family and in the state.