Who was Ludwig Tieck

Ludwig Tieck

Johann Ludwig Tieck, known as Ludwig Tieck, * 31. May 1773 in Berlin, † April 28, 1853 in Berlin, was a German poet, translator and writer of the Romantic period.

He gave fundamental suggestions for the ideas of the epoch. With his novellas, Tieck became a model for this genre. He also published under the pseudonyms Peter Lebrecht and Gottlieb Färber and was known for his translations and the editing of works by important writers.

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curriculum vitae

  • At the May 31, 1773 Johann Ludwig Tieck, known as Ludwig Tieck, was born in Berlin as the son of the trained master rope maker Johann Ludwig Tieck and his wife Anna Sophie, née Berukin. He is the oldest of three siblings.[1]

  • Even at pre-school age, Tieck received an education from his father. He got to know the works of Goethe, Schiller, Shakespeare and Cervantes at an early age.

  • From 1782 he attended the Friedrich-Werdersche Gymnasium under the direction of Friedrich Gedike, where he became friends with Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder.

  • Tieck is interested in the theater and acting. Clemens Brentano is said to have called him the greatest actor who never took a stage.

  • A literary talent can be recognized early on. He works with his teachers August Ferdinand Bernhardi and Friedrich Eberhard Rambach and helps them to write trivial sensational novels.[2]

  • From 1792 Tieck studies theology, history and philology at the universities in Halle (1792), Göttingen (1792/1793 and 1793/1794) and Erlangen (1793).
  • He is particularly interested in English literature, which is later shown in his well-known Shakespeare and Cervantes translations.

  • Together with Wackenroder, Tieck studies one semester in Erlangen and travels together to Nuremberg and through Franconia. He records impressions of these trips in his travelogues.

  • Back in Göttingen, starts in autumn 1793 an exchange of letters between Tieck and Wackenroder.[3]

  • 1794 Tieck decides to live as a freelance writer, breaks off his studies and returns to Berlin.
  • Of 1794 to 1798 he writes narratives in the almanac Ostrich feathers published by the Berlin publisher and well-known representative of the late Enlightenment Friedrich Nicolai.

  • 1795/1796 he writes the stories Abdallah, Peter Lebrecht (Tieck uses this name as a pseudonym, among other things) and the letter novel The story of Mr. William Lovellwhich later earned him the recognition of his friends.

  • 1797 he is working on it together with Wackenroder Heart pouring from an art-loving monastery brother. With this work you make an essential contribution to romantic literature.
  • In the same year Tieck wrote the artist novel Franz Sternbald's walks, the 1798 is published. He thus significantly sets the direction for romantic novels and influences Novalis and Joseph von Eichendorff.

  • Tieck starts working on old folk tales and fairy tales. Ironic, dramatic and satirical fairy tale games such as Puss in Boots (1797), Knight Bluebeard (1797) and The blond Eckbert (1797).

  • In Berlin, Tieck frequented the literary salon of Henriette Herz, Rahel Levin and Dorothea Veit. 1797/1798 he made the acquaintance of August Wilhelm and Friedrich Schlegel here.

  • 1798 Dieck's friend Wackenroder dies.
  • In the same year, Tieck married Amalie Alberti, the daughter of the Hamburg theologian Julius Gustav Alberti. The daughters Dorothea and Agnes result from the marriage.

  • 1799 to 1800 Tieck stays among the early romantics in Jena (see Jena Romanticism), where he enjoys the intellectual exchange with the brothers Schlegel, Caroline and Dorothea Schlegel, Novalis, Schelling and Henrik Steffens.
  • He also made the acquaintance of Jean Paul, Goethe and Fichte. During this time he wrote his Romantic seals.

  • 1800 Tieck suffers a first severe attack of gout. A first sign of the poet's decline in health.

  • 1801 Tieck enriches the literary program of early romanticism with his Don Quixote translation.
  • In the same year Novalis and the dies Jena district disintegrates. Tieck moved to Dresden for a short time, where he came into contact with younger romantics such as Achim von Arnim and the painter Philipp Otto Runge.

  • In the autumn 1802 Tieck moves with his family, plagued by depression, to rural Ziebingen in the Mark Brandenburg to the estate of his friend Burgsdorff.
  • Here he meets the third daughter of Count Karl Finck von Finckenstein. He begins a relationship with Henriette von Finckenstein and she becomes a muse and patron for him.[4]

  • 1804 The result is the reading drama known as a comedy Emperor Octavianus, in which the program is a progressive universal poetry(see Novalis) reveals.

  • During his time in Ziebingen, Tieck undertook numerous study trips: Munich (1804, from 1808-1810), Rome (1805/1806), Vienna (1808), Prague (1813) and London and Paris (1817).
  • During this time, the philosopher Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand Solger and Friedrich von Raumer had an influence on Tieck's work.
  • Tieck works primarily on translations and adaptations of various pieces and delivers 1812Phantasus. A collection of fairy tales, short stories, plays and short stories out.

  • 1819 Tieck moves to Dresden with his wife, daughters and Henriette von Finckenstein.
  • Tieck is court advisor and dramaturge of the theater (from 1825) and thus occupies a central position in cultural city life. He organizes reading evenings that are becoming popular and is gaining more and more prominence as a writer.

  • 1821 the first two novels appear The mysterious one and The paintings. To 1841 follow more than thirty short stories.[5]

  • In the same year he publishes the writings of Heinrich von Kleist that he left behind.

  • 1825 to 1833 Tieck completes August Wilhelm Schlegel's Shakespeare translation as editor and publisher.[6]

  • After Goethe's death 1832 Tieck is considered the greatest living German poet, but comes under strong criticism and condescension of the young Germans (see Young Germany, Vormärz).

  • Several strokes of fate have accompanied Dresden over the past few years.
  • 1836 Tieck survived a traffic accident with very serious injuries on the way to Baden-Baden for a spa stay. 1837 his wife Amalie dies.

  • 1838 Tieck writes his masterpiece, the novella Abundance of life.

  • 1840 Tieck deals with the emancipation of women in his novel Vittoria Accorombona and thus hits a current topic of its time.

  • In February 1841 Dieck's daughter Dorothea dies. Both had an intensive collaboration on translations.
  • In the same year Tieck's last novella was written solitude of the forest.

  • 1842 Tieck moves to Berlin at the invitation of Friedrich Wilhelm IV. On behalf of the king, he is to bring sample performances onto the stage of the New Palace in Potsdam.[7]
  • Meanwhile, Tieck suffers a stroke and as a result suffers from deteriorating health.

  • 1847 Countess Finckenstein dies - a great loss for Tieck.

  • Tieck spends the last years of his life lonely, resigned and ill. The German Revolution of 1848 encounters his incomprehension.

  • 1849 he sells his library, consisting of 16,000 volumes, which at this point has already been pledged to Brockhaus-Verlag in order to support his brother financially.

  • Ludwig Tieck dies on April 28, 1853 in Berlin.
  • [1] His sister Anna Sophie wrote fairy tales, romantic stories and magazine articles. The brother Christian Friedrich was an important sculptor who helped shape the classicist style of the early 19th century.

  • [2] Tieck's literary style can already be seen in the chapter Ryno in Rambach's novelThe iron mask recognize (published in 1792 under the pseudonym Ottokar Sturm).

  • [3] This correspondence is one of the most important correspondence of early Romanticism.

  • [4] Patrons are people who financially support artistic, cultural and sporting activities.

  • [5] This is where Tieck established the realistic novella tradition of the 19th century (see realism).

  • [6] He is often mentioned here as a translator, but actually worked exclusively as an editor and publisher.

  • [7] The production of Sheakespeares is particularly successful in this context Midsummer Night's Dream with incidental music by Mendelsohn-Bartholdy (1843).

Works

  • Complete Works
  • Peter Lebrecht. A story without adventures, short story, 1795–1796
  • The two strangest days in Siegmund's life, Narrative, 1796
  • William Lovell, Epistle novel in three volumes, 1795–1796
  • Heart pouring from an art-loving monastery brother, with W. H. Wackenroder, 1797
  • The seven wives of Bluebeard, Narrative, 1797
  • Folk tales, Fairy tale, 1797
  • Love story of the beautiful Magelone and Count Peter of Provence, Narrative, 1797
  • Franz Sternbald's walks, An old German story in two volumes, 1798
  • The wrong world, Play, 1798
  • Romantic seals, 1799–1800
  • Prince Zerbino, Comedy, 1799
  • The rune mountain, Narrative, 1804
  • Emperor Octavianus, Reading drama, 1804
  • Love spell, Narrative, 1811
  • Phantasus. A collection of fairy tales, short stories, plays and short stories, three volumes, 1812–1816
  • Poems, three volumes, 1821–1823
  • The paintings, Novella, 1822
  • Novellas, seven volumes, 1823–1828
  • Dramaturgical sheets, two volumes, 1852
  • Poet life. First part, novella, 1825
  • The uproar in the Cevennes, Novella, 1826
  • The scholar, Novella, 1827
  • The Witches' Sabbath, Novella, 1831
  • Collected short stories. Increased and improved, 14 volumes, 1835–1842
  • The young master carpenter, Novella in two volumes, 1836
  • Abundance of life, Novella, 1839
  • Vittoria Accorombona, Novel in two volumes, 1840
  • Critical Writings, four volumes, 1848–1852
  • Collected short stories, 1852–1854
  • Legacy writings, 1855
  • The book on Shakespeare. Handwritten records, 1920
  • Critical about Shakespeare, ca.1849

  • Translations
    • Don Quixote by Cervantes, four volumes, 1799–1801
    • Works by Shakespeare, with A. W. Schlegel, W. von B., his daughter D. Tieck:
      • First edition, 1797–1810 (without Tiecks participation)
      • First edition of the Schlegel-Tieck translation, 9 volumes, 1825–1833
      • Second edition, 1839-1840
      • Third edition, 1843–1844
    • Old English theater, two volumes, 1811

  • Letters
      Letters to Ludwig Tieck, selected and ed. by Karl von Holtei, 1864
  • Letters of Ludwig Tieck, ed. Edwin H. Zeydel, P. Matenko, R. H. Fife, 1973
  • Ludwig Tieck and Ida von Lüttichau in their letters, ed. by Otto Fiebiger, 1937
  • Letters to and from Ludwig Tieck ..., ed. P. Matenko, E. H. Zeydel, B. M. Masche, 1967
  • Ludwig Tieck, ed. by Uwe Schweikert, 1971
  • Ludwig Tieck and the Schlegel brothers. Letters, ed. Edgar Lohner, 1972

  • As editor
      Fantasies about art by Wilhelm Heinrich Wackenroder, 1799
  • Poetic Journal, 1799
  • Minnelongs from the Swabian era, 1803
  • In addition, Tieck published works by Novalis, Maler Müller, Jakob Michael Reinhold Lenz, Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand Solger, Franz Berthold ...