What's your favorite food in France

Thursday, September 20, 2018 3:09:19 PM Europe / Berlin

Hardly any national cuisine is as well known and as respected as the French. It is not for nothing that France is the origin of the still notorious Michelin stars for outstanding restaurants. The “Haute Cuisine” inspires the world and so it is hardly surprising that some classics from the “Land of Red Wine and Cheese” have come to our direct neighbors in Germany and are firmly anchored in our culinary thinking.

 

But are we really familiar with these “classics”? We picked out three typically French foods and ‘took a closer look: What is croissant & Co. all about? 3 French Classics We Should Know Better:

The croissant

Right at the beginning the absolute classic of the French - but there is one tiny little thing: The croissant doesn't come from France at all. Allegedly the Austrians invented it at the end of the 17th century: At that time Vienna was to be besieged by the Turks, the Austrian bakers, who were usually up early, heard the Turkish troops trying to dig a tunnel, raised the alarm and saved them City. From then on, the “croissants” were baked in the shape of the Turkish crescent, as a sign of triumph.


Well, anyway: It was the French who perfected the croissant and made it famous. That's why they can still claim a large part of the fame, right?

The hollandaise sauce

Just to be clear: the hollandaise sauce actually comes from France. But what about the word “Holland” in the name? Copied by the Dutch? No! The sauce owes its name to one of its main ingredients: butter. Then as now, it came in very good quality from Holland. And so the name of the creamy sauce was determined.


The popular, buttery sauce is also known under the name Sauce Isigny, named after the French town of Ville d’Isigny in Normandy, where very good butter was also made.

Café de Paris

Whether as a warm sauce or a cold dip with baguette - we love it Café de Paris! And even if the name does not suggest it, this spicy sauce creation is not French through and through. The sauce was made in Switzerland in the 1930s, more precisely in the Boubier family's “Restaurant du Coq d’Or” in Geneva. At that time, Madame Boubier's daughter married the owner of the “Café de Paris” restaurant, who was particularly good at one thing: a buttery sauce that was henceforth called Café de Paris.


The “Chez Boubier Café de Paris” restaurant in Geneva is still open today! It is known far beyond the city limits for having only one warm dish on the menu: Entrecôte with… of course, Sauce Café de Paris.


If you don't just happen to want to travel a few hundred kilometers for your meal: just bring your Café de Paris home. With our delicious mixture you can conjure up the delicious sauce on your plate and put a smile on your face in no time at all.

If your food is not at all “Haute Cuisine” -like, our French all-rounder is always happy to help. Whether in ratatouille, risotto or in gratins of all kinds - the all-rounder is simply très bien everywhere. Bon Apétit!

Ratatouille

Ratatouille recipe like from France: We'll show you how to conjure up a delicious ratatouille recipe from zucchini, tomatoes, aubergines and peppers.

What you need: (for 4 servings)

  • 1 large eggplant

  • 1 large vegetable onion

  • 4 cloves of garlic

  • 2 large zucchini

  • 2 large red peppers

  • 2 large yellow peppers

  • 1 large can of peeled tomatoes

  • 2 tbsp olive oil

  • 1 tbsp tomato paste

  • 3-4 pinches of JS French all-rounder

  • 1 teaspoon of sugar

  • Salt pepper

That's how it works:

 

First, wash and clean the aubergine and cut into bite-sized pieces. Then you season the eggplant pieces with salt, let them steep for at least 10 minutes and then pat them dry.
Step by step:
First, wash and clean the aubergine and cut into bite-sized pieces. Then you season the aubergine pieces with salt, let them steep for at least 10 minutes and then pat them dry.
In the meantime, you can chop the rest of the vegetables: peel the onions and cut them into large cubes, peel the garlic and cut into fine cubes, then clean, wash and cut the zucchini. Halve and core the peppers lengthways, wash and cut into large pieces.
Step by step:
In the meantime you can chop the rest of the vegetables: peel the onions and cut them into large cubes, peel the garlic and cut into fine cubes, then clean, wash and cut the zucchini. Halve and core the peppers lengthways, wash and cut into large pieces.
Heat the oil in a large saucepan and fry the onion, garlic and zucchini in it, then add the peppers and finally the eggplant. Fry everything vigorously for about 5 minutes. Then add the tomato paste, stir in and season with the JS French Allrounder.
Step by step:
Heat the oil in a large saucepan and fry the onion, garlic and zucchini in it, then add the peppers and finally the eggplant. Fry everything vigorously for about 5 minutes. Then add the tomato paste, stir in and season with the JS French Allrounder.
Finally add the peeled tomatoes and sugar. Let the ratatouille simmer over medium heat for about 20 minutes, adding some water if necessary. The vegetables should still have a bit of bite at the end of the cooking time. Before serving, season the ratatouille again vigorously.
Step by step:
Finally add the peeled tomatoes and sugar. Let the ratatouille simmer over medium heat for about 20 minutes, adding some water if necessary. The vegetables should still have a bit of bite at the end of the cooking time. Before serving, season the ratatouille again vigorously.