Who ran the fastest 100 meters of all time

World record development in the 100-meter run: the fastest men of all time

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The champion in the 100-meter run is always the king of the sprinters. SPOX looks back on the milestones in the world record development of the fastest men in the world.

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The first world record over 100 meters was set 107 years ago. On July 6, 1912, the American Donald Lippincott needed 10.6 seconds for the supreme sprinter discipline in Stockholm.

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The first really big name appears on the world record list in 1936. The American Jesse Owens, the hero of the Berlin Olympic Games, replaced the Japanese Takayoshi Yoshioka (10.3) in Chicago in June 1936 in 10.2 seconds.

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Owens' world record lasted 20 years. However, several sprinters managed to cover the 100 meters in 10.2 seconds at the same time. Among other things, the German Heinz Fütterer (picture) managed this in October 1954 in Yokohama.

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Willie Williams (USA) broke the Owens record in 10.01 seconds in August 1956 in Berlin. Almost four years later, in June 1960 in Zurich, the German Armin Hary (photo) broke the record - 100 meters in exactly 10 seconds!

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Hary's record lasted eight years. In June 1968 (Sacramento) and October 1968 (Mexico City), Jim Hines (USA) was the first person to sprint the 100 meters in less than ten seconds (9.95), which has now been electronically stopped.

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After Calvin Smith (USA / 9.93 seconds) broke the world record in Colorado Springs in July 1983, Ben Johnson (picture) from Canada hit the world of sprinters like a bomb in 1987.

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At the World Cup in Rome in 1987, he raced the 100 meters in a fabulous time of 9.83 seconds. At the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, Johnson even undercut this mark again - 9.79 seconds!

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The scandal followed a few days after its "run of the century". Johnson was convicted of doping, so his records do not appear on any official list.

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Smith's world record was finally broken by Carl Lewis (picture) in Seoul in September 1988. The American took 9.92 seconds.

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Leroy Burrell (USA, picture) broke the record from Lewis in New York in June 1991. Lewis countered just two months later in Tokyo (9.86). Burrell stayed with it and three years later, in July 1994 in Lausanne, he set the world record back in 9.85 seconds.

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Donovan Bailey (picture) broke the world record in 9.84 seconds (CAN, July 1996 in Atlanta) and Maurice Greene in 9.79 seconds (USA, June 1999 in Athens) before the Jamaicans began to dominate six years later.

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Asafa Powell was the name of the first super sprinter from the Caribbean. In June 2005 (Athens), June 2006 (Gateshead) and August 2006 (Zurich) he ran the 100 meters in 9.77 seconds each. In September 2007 he improved his own record in Rieti (9.74).

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Then Usain Bolt took the big stage. The Jamaican from Sherwood Content set world records in May 2008 in New York City (9.72 seconds) and in August 2008 at the Olympics in Beijing (9.69 seconds).

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On August 16, 2009 the big "lightning strike" followed at the World Cup in the Olympic Stadium in Berlin. Bolt set the world record over 100 meters that is still valid today in a magical 9.58 seconds. A record for the ages?